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    The Mad Inklings of Troy Nixey

    I first ran across Troy Nixey’s artwork on Facebook, likely because he was a friend of a Facebook friend and his work appeared on that friend’s page.  Whatever the case, thank goodness for social media (though fewer people are saying that these days) because it introduced me to the work of a modern ink-slinging master.  Troy had a Big Cartel page at the time and would sporadically offer up ink gems for sale.  The subject matter varied, from monsters and guys with lightbulbs atop their heads, to assorted thugs and the great Lobster Johnson.  The thing that remained consistent was the beautiful, lush, textured inking that Troy brings to his…

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    The Action-Packed Stop-Motion of T.S. Sullivant

    Much has been written about T.S. Sullivant’s wonderful work over the years, so I’ll try not to rehash what’s been written previously, but for those new to Sullivant’s work, 1) I envy your first-time exposure to his incredible drawings, and 2) I’ll present the briefest of biographical blurbs.  Thomas Starling Sullivant (1854–1926) was born in Columbus, Ohio and raised partially in Germany.  When Sullivant was 18, he moved from Columbus to Europe for a few years, eventually moving back to the States, where he studied with the famous painter and teacher Thomas Eakins, at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia.  At 32, Sullivant was a late entrant…

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    The Visual Verve and Vibrancy of Bud Blake and Tiger

    The Home News was the newspaper in central New Jersey that my family subscribed to when I was a kid.  It’s where I was introduced to the weirdness of Ernie Bushmiller’s Nancy, the trials and tribulations of Harry Hanan’s Louie, and the beautifully drawn, sweetly humored Tiger by Bud Blake.  Growing up, Tiger was comfortably familiar to me.  Blake’s gags revolved around everyday kid stuff.  The strip didn’t have the psychological weight of Peanuts.  There wasn’t a ton of depth to the cast of characters.  We knew that Punkinhead could be a nudge, Hugo liked to eat, and Julius was a bookish type.  Tiger himself was sort of his strip’s…